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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 2,160 (some duplicates have been removed)
voice of america. steve redisch will join us. >> told phil talked of a leak types in different cities. berchtold he talked to a hold a wide range of people. explore the countryside here he wanted to and understand what makes american stick. he had read that americans were individualistic. he actually saw us as much more collectivist this. it seems hard for us to imagine. he saw the u.s. as a group of people who like to form associations. who wanted to always be with other people. after he went to the u.s., he saw the french as the individualists. from that, he concluded that he was going to put up his colossal statute. he was going to have to say something to people who understood themselves as a big group. as a society. as a collective entity. >> watch this whole event as part of our lineup. it includes a discussion on how social media has changed the news coverage. commencement speeches from new york mayor, cory booker, and he long must -- elon musk. that starts at 8:00 p.m. eastern on c-span. >> we had pulled into the spot that morning. >> the former commanding officer of th
by those who are loaning us money will erode. we won't be able to control that time, but one thing we know is that when it comes, it will come quickly. it's a scary thought. we see greece. we see europe. you saw this week spain and italy. and you see a problem of debt, de-leveraging, for which they have no answer, and then we see what happened this week in terms of the security of the united states in terms of our own finances, and what you realize is that we're the best looking horse in the glue factory. [ laughter ] we're the only rosebud that isn't starting to wilt. and so our -- the comfort that we've experiencing today is really based on a relative comfort based on how the world is viewed everywhere else but here. europe's troubles will give us a reprieve, but they won't solve our problems. that's why leadership is so important, and -- and let me step aside for a minute. all the republican candidates in the primary i knew. i knew them well, from newt gingrich, to ron paul, to tim pawlenty, to rick santorum, and as a conservative i endorsed mitt romney. and as a physician i want to tel
one of the real stalwarts in the u.s. senate. i'm honored to be here, senator tom coburn is the person i'm privileged to introduce. he and his wife carolyn have a great history in oklahoma for all of the accomplishments in their lives. of course one of the greatest would be their three children and six grandchildren. outside of that, mr. coburn and his wife are both graduates of oklahoma state university and i'm sure along with t. boone pickens they want to see a national championship come their way. senator coburn has a track record of a lot of wins in other areas. these wins would be found with his family, faith, business, formerly he was in the u.s. house, then the senate, and as a medical doctor. he's a man of integrity. people know that he is a man of his word, when he says he's going to do something, he does it. when he pledged he was going to be in the house for six years he lived up to that term limits pledge and i think he was the only republican to ever hold the seat up 'til that time in the previously democratic second district of oklahoma and then he was elected as we know
issuings. but i don't think europe will put us in a whole. experts make up only two percent of american gdp. if you see the u.s. banks pull back on lending we'll have problems. >> to victoria's point. then europe and china matter more on the u.s. economy. what do you think? >> i think we were so burned by the 2008 melt down that many people didn't see we overdo the threat on the horizon. victoria is right. it takes a couple of 10ths of a point and we are perilous close to a rescission. i don't think it is a big event. rick, they are worried about the fiscal christs and we have a capitol strike going on. u.s. treasuriers saying we are parking 50 percent of the debt in u.s. backings. isn't that poor of problem. >> we hear the bad news and it makes us nervous . victoria hit the fact on the nose. two percent of the gdp comes from the sales.own yes, recessin highly unlikely. what does worry me. u.s. banks have far more exposure to the european front than we are told. it is a credit crunch we could do without. >> i think mike hasn't heard the news yet. the u.s. housing market bottomed on tuesday
moderator of "meet the press" with us from our washington newsroom tonight. so, david, give us a viewer's guide to what we're seeing here. >> this is really an attempt by the obama campaign to talk about what it wants to talk about, and that is mitt romney's time as head of bain capital. why? because they would not like to talk about the jobs report right now and the tough economy. they want to talk about mitt romney as a very wealthy person who ran a venture capital firm and put the onus on him to explain whether he was involved in outsourcing of jobs, keep up the pressure about whether bain was exploiting workers and companies. really to make the case to middle class voters that mitt romney is not on their side and president obama is. that's the argument. that's why they want the attention here and why they'll focus on this period of time of just what mitt romney was doing when he was filing papers to the s.e.c. saying he was still the chairman even though he says as you just heard he had no operational involvement. >> all right. david gregory, we will look for you sunday morning on "
in this country and strongly supports joining the law of the sea. marvin was unable to join us today, but he has submitted testimony for the record. in his full testimony, we place in the record as if right here in full. a short excerpt. if the united states were to become a party to the convention, it could participate in the internationally recognized process for claiming extended continental shelf and the rights over oil and gas which would provide legal certainty for accessing and developing those energy resources. without this clear claim, our company would not find investment conditions favorable. finally, we turn to manufacturing. as many of you know, rare earth minerals are critical to a large part of modern manufacturing. rare earth minerals are an essential component of communication systems and defense control systems and missile defense control technology and other weapons systems. it includes the breath of their scope of rare either mineral use and it's in electronics and in computers and cell phones and all of the advanced weapons systems, some of which i named. today, my friends,
and a dancing together across every conceivable and imaginable difference. i have believed the world looks to us to say it is -- if it is possible to live together across every conceivable difference. we're proud of our home and place in history and proud of our example. but we also are humble in the context of the world we're living in. a world that is another connected but hyper-connected with a merger of i.t. and globalization. we recognize our faith -- fate is connected to the fate of others. that is the spirit that binds us together. the spirit that brings us here today. i want to close by reminding you that california is the birthplace as mayor lee was saying of life science, biotech, the home of the california stem cell institute, a state with more engineers, more scientists, more global -- nobel laureate's than any other state or we still lay claim to five of the top universities based on the shanghai index in the world. caltech, stanford university, and three of our public universities, not least of which the university is a stone's throw away. uc-berkeley campus. we're proud of the sta
minutes. >> thank you, orval, and senator for joining us today for our conversation about ian bremmer's wonderful new book. this book is about the g-0 world. he is a fabulous political scientist who really speaks to the big major changes underway in the world today, getting beyond the ivory tower. he has been making some money, which come as a fellow political scientist, i think this is a great tribute, but it also shows how politics and government are really driving so much of the global economy, so that the economists knowledge is really not sufficient, even for investors, as well as ordinary citizens to understand where we are going. this book is very interesting, we have this new concept of the g-0 world. it is really about the problem of global cooperation. it is not so much a book about the competition among nations. it is about the kind of leadership in the world today. i wanted to start off they may be telling us you really think that the united states has been an effective leader up until now, and that it is really -- it is really a loss of american leadership that this book
is viewed everywhere else but here. europe's troubles will give us a reprieve, but they won't solve our problems. that's why leadership is so important, and -- and let me step aside for a minute. all the republican candidates in the primary i knew. i knew them well, from newt gingrich, to ron paul, to tim pawlenty, to rick santorum, and as a conservative i endorsed mitt romney. and as a physician i want to tell you why. the problem in our country isn't that we don't have solutions. the problem in our country is that we don't have leadership, bold leadership that will teach and taught to the american public as adults and then lead on those principles, and if you go look at the life of mitt romney, at every juncture, at every intersection, at every challenge in his life and in his professional career he has demonstrated the qualities of leadership that i want for my children and grandchildren. [ applause ] and i would just have you contrast that with what we have today in the white house. the other thing i would have you think about in terms of the problems in front of us is the contrast
should be dedicated and i don't know how any of us can say with the proper number of children to be medicated would be. how many hundreds of thousands would be the right number. i just hope that in so far as kids are getting this care that it's done in a sensitive way, and in a way that is as productive and helpful for their long-term development as possible. >> guest: there is a serious problem of abuse of occasions of stimulants that gets a lot of media attention, doesn't necessarily help in terms of understanding why kids are being prescribed medication. it does however point to the pressures that are bearing down on these kids they feel like we have to be sort of superhuman. to what extent do you think we can in white society for kids mental health problems? should we be indicting society? should we have a biological view and see these kids will be having problems no matter what? where do you come down thinking about that? .. >> yes. that is his takeover if the child is impaired not functioning as they should be to let them go on that way. >> it is fascinating. the book sh
firml negotiating rights last u.s. partner saying it will be used as political campaign. parliament's approval of the support for fukushima daiichi plant in japan. >>> public support for nuclear energy in demonstrators held their latest post-fukushima protest aimed at pressuring the government to rally was 2011 disaster. >> reporter: they brave heat and humidity to come out in historic numbers. these protesters in tokyo are demand thousands of people are here to say no power. >> translator: nuclear power is too dangerous humans inred explosio is still otest after protest urging the government to stop using atomice and academy award winning musician. they told the crowd life and health are much more important than economic people came out today to lis their own government stop restarting nuclear plants and decommission them. things. when i think about my child and other children in fukushima, i cannot help butt shame for all japanese if another nuclear accident happens again. really angry. this is terrible politics that politicians play. >> reporter: government
's possible use of chemical weapons. >> brown: then, we examine the use of a one-drug lethal injection on a prisoner last night in texas-- the state that executes more convicts than any other. >> suarez: as delegates arrive in washington for an international aids conference, we have two progress reports: gwen ifill gets an update from the director of the united nations program on aids. >> brown: and we assess the epidemic here in our nation's capital, where the infection rate is the highest in the country. >> we have people who will be tested repeatedly in hopes that one of those tests will be negative so that they can say i don't have.i.v. we have people who think they can pray their h.i.v. away. >> suarez: plus, as part of his ongoing series, hari sreenivasan talks with native americans about the search for solutions to the effects of climate change on their tribal lands. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and the lliam and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and
, the exchanges between the governments and the companies between the two sides. as the largest economy in the u.s., california boasts the resources and a strong advantage in high tech, bio-science, agriculture, fisheries, and the forestry, and even tourism. and in terms of cooperation with china, california enjoys exceptional economic, cultural, and geographical locations and advantages. it is always is the gateway of the united states to china. as the economic and trade cooperation between china and the united states and california deepens, now we believe that trade and investment keeps growing. china is the third largest export destination for california. many multinationals like hp, intel, cisco, and chevron are doing well in china. they're making money in china. at the same time, as the close relationship is going on, many chinese companies are working in san francisco in california. i would like to name a few. the tsl, ciuts, just to name a few. these are successful chinese companies working here. as the american companies in china, the chinese companies working in california in san francisc
in its most important task on its agenda this year. >> brown: the u.s. ambassador to the u.n. susan rice minced no words after russia and china once again vetoed a resolution that threatened sanctions on syria. >> one can only hope that one day before too many thousands more die, that russia and china will stop protecting assad and allow this council to play its proper role at center of the >> brown: it was the third time moscow and beijing have blocked u.n. efforts to make syrian president bashar al-assad stop the attacks on his own people. and this latest veto drew condemnation from country after country. >> mr. president today was an opportunity lost, history will show us price that the people in syria and beyond will have to pay. >> by exercising their veto today, russia and china are failing in their responsibilities as permanent members of the security council to help resolve the crisis in syria. >> ( translated ): in our judgment that resolution was best opportunity and perhaps the only opportunity to put an end to the mindless violence that affects the syrian arab republic. >> br
ten years when the u.s. first after september 11th invaded afghanistan. i don't know, some of you are too young to remember, but others of us might remember looking at our tv screens and seeing the pictures of these very fancy, new weapons that we had. this idea that we know had these precision weapons that would only target the people that we wanted to get and would not result in collateral damage. and it was almost a way to say to people, calmed down, don't be worried. we will be killing innocent people. so, i was worried because i don't have as sense that the latest and greatest new weapon is going to protect innocent people and went to afghanistan three weeks after the invasion with several other colleagues. it was before we even got into afghanistan on the border of pakistan that we found already people who would be considered collateral damage. the first young woman i met is somebody who sticks with me because she looked like my daughter. she was 13 years old. my daughter at that time was 13 years old. i felt an affinity with her and asked her if i could learn about her stor
say chinese authorities aren't transparent about their spending. the u.s. and japan and other countries are concerned about china's military muscle. the chinese government has been more aggressive in its campaign to force the claim over disputed islands in the region. analysts say it is partly intended to keep other countries in check over the disputes. >>> analysts are sounding the alarm about the naval buildup. their annual white paper says recent actions by chinese authorities are a grave concern for east asia and the rest of the world. this year's report says china's defense budget increased by 30 times over the past 24 years. defense officials believe the growth is from building aircraft carriers and say chinese leaders are dispatching war ships more frequently to the south china sea and east china sea. the latter is home to the senkaku islands. which both china and taiwan claim. the wipe paper claims ownership. defense officials will submit the report to the cabinet and then release it to the public by the end of this month. public anger over the deployment of military a
condition. it was the worst mass shooting in the u.s. since the killings of 32 people at virginia tech five years ago. we'll have more on the store after the headlines. syrian rebels continue to make gains on the regime of bashar al-assad, seizing a number of border crossings with neighboring iraq and turkey. opposition fighters overrun government forces at two major crossings, including one controlling the vital trade route on the damascus to baghdad highway. meanwhile, the syrian government says the country's intelligence chief, hisham ikhtiyar, has died from injuries sustained in wednesday's bombing of a high- level meeting in damascus, making him the fourth assad regime insider to die in the attack. and it's the violence, the united nations is warning 1 million syrians are now believed to be internally displaced, double the previous estimate. the fighting continues in syria one day after russia and china vetoed a security council resolution threatening new sanctions on the syrian regime. russia and china say they took action over demands for the inclusion of penalties under chapter seve
.n. security council after russia and china, again, exercised their veto power. the u.s. ambassador t tthe united nations says russia and china are protecting the syrian president and that thousands of civilians uld die as a result. susan rice spoke after the russian and chinese representatives at u.n. security council vetoed the latest resolution on the conflict in syria. the draft would have permitted nonmilitary sanctions if president assad's government refused to stop using heavy artillery within ten days and the resolution called for a 45-day extension of the u.n. cease-fire observers mission. the current term expires on friday. it's a third time russia and china have vetoed u.n. resolutions on syria. >> the security council has failed utterly. this is another dark day in turtle bay. one can only hope that one day, before too many thousands more die, that russia and china will stop protecting assad and allow -- >> western nations are expected to try to dlaft another resolution to extend the mission of the u.n. cease-fire observers. u.n. secretary general ban ki-moon regrets the securi
is cooling, we look at what the slowdown means for u.s. corporate earnings, and the global economy. >> susie: and one company is making a big push into china, marriott international, a look at its latest earnings and strategy. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r.!" >> tom: markets were clearly disappointed today the federal reserve does not seem ready to act right away to boost the economy. minutes from the fed's june meeting show only a few policy makers wanted to expand a bond buying program known as quantitative easing to lower interest rates and boost the economy. but as darren gersh reports this is now really a question of timing. >> reporter: the fed was not willing to give markets an immediate monetary fix, but the latest readings from its policy making committee show a couple more lukewarm reports on the labor market might change that. >> and if these employment reports are still weak like this last one, i think a strong case could be made for the fed to expand its balance sheet and try to support the economy more. so, at that point it will be clear that the recovery has stalled
>>> the road to kabul. pakistan agrees to reopen the supply routes to afghanistan. u.s. and pakistani leaders have come to agreement that will help nato soldiers to wrap up the mission in afghanistan. they agreed to reopen the routes to pakistan. the u.s. uses the roads to bring in goods and fuel. secretary of state hillary clinton discussed the details over the phone with the pakstani foreign minister. >> the foreign minister karr has advised her the ground lines of communication will be reopening. >> u.s. troops in afghanistan killed 24 pakistani soldiers in error last november in a cross-border air strike. pakistani blocked the supply routes. clinton offered an apology and expressed the condolences to the families of the dead soldiers. the islamic extremist group, the pakistani taliban criticized the agreement. members threat tuned attack u.s. convoys. nato leaders said the agreement demonstrates strengthened cooperation between their forces and pakistan. the signed treaties with other central asian countries to provide access into afghanistan, but those roadways pro
the globe take action to boost their sagging economies. should more be done in the u.s.? >> susie: i'm susie gharib. getting new medicines to market faster. speeding up the government's drug approval process. why investors and patients are on board. >> tom: and "made in america" tonight, a craft beer company brewing up a national expansion. >> susie: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: the global economy was the hot topic in markets around the world today. central banks in europe, the u.k., and china announced moves to boost growth. the european central bank lowered interest rates to an all-time low. china cut several key interest rates for the second time in a month. and the bank of england held its rates steady, but said it will pump billions of dollars into its economy through a new round of bond buying. here in the u.s., some hopeful signs for the weak job market. private employers added 176,000 new workers to their payrolls in june, stronger than the previous month. and the labor department said the number of people filing for unemployment benefits dropped by 14,000 in the past
in the managed index funds, gus, good to have you on the program, thank you for joining us on the program. >>> thank you. >> so we got the jobs numbers out on friday, the unemployment rate at 8.2%, the number of jobs created, another big disappointment. 80 thousand jobs, what did you expect? and what do you think it tells us about the economy right now. >> well, the adp number came out the day before, people were very excited about the number, which was up. in fact when the labor department number came out it was really off a little bit from where people had previously expected it to be, a little bit of disappointment. it didn't surprise us. we expected weakness throughout the summer, we think the economy will start to improve in the latter part of the year, perhaps the latter part of the third quarter and fourth quarter. >> and as the economy has gotten worse, the federal reserve says we will be there if more stimulus is needed. we saw global moves, the bank of england and china, what is your outlook on the global economy? and is it all up to the feds at this point? >> well, i think it n
is probably correct. what will eventually happen is u.s. companies will be forced to partner with other nations who have acceded to the treaty the 161 i believe that were mentioned earlier to find opportunities around the globe because they cannot find certainty or protect their own interests through u.s. law, thought u.s. practice, and so, we find they're teaming up with the russians and with the chinese and others or their preference would be to take the lead and to go alone or to find others as their junior partners in assessing and managing this risk. >> my definition of these partnerships, we already divide up the profits, leaving aside the royalties in the sixth year. >> well, that's right, and plus, you're at the behest of others in looking for those partners. we have, i might say, the best companies in the world, the most technologically advanced. we are on the cutting edge of the abilities to go out in the deep waters and produce these energy resources. wide open risk without any limitation is a clear detriment, and as you've heard those people making the decisions in the board
assistance and no u.s. dollars and there were global fund dollars available for hiv and the prospects of her living and what she's doing now in her community because those dollars are at work there in her community are tremendous. there are 5.5 million people approximately in the world in low and middle income countries that receive hiv treatment and are on retrovirals because of foreign assistance programs funded by the united states and by other donor countries and especially the global fund. when we asked the question getting back to the title of the panel, to aid or not to aid. do i think we have to aid? yes, i think we have to aid. it is in the best interest as a country and it is our right and our responsibility as one of the world's global leaders. is it -- could it be more effective? absolutely. should we fund more? i think so, but right now we're living in a time in history where the world is changing more than ever before and millions of people still live in extreme poverty. we know that extreme poverty and social and economic conditions breed fear, hopelessness and terror, frankly
to the special interests, it's up to you. >> opening day of the olympics and the u.s. makes a splash. we have highlights from all the competition. baltimore fans tell us what it is like to watch michael phelps battle it out with ryan lochte. those stories and a forecast for sunday and the start of the workweek. >> live, local, late breaking. [captioning made possible by constellation energy group] captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- >> thank you for staying up with us. the u.s. begins the olympics with a bang. five medals on day one that there was disappointment when michael phelps did not make the top three. traci has the results from olympic park. >> and the so-called pool dual, lochte won the individual medley by a full three seconds. >> i am so happy. i had my family cheering for me. >> michael phelps barely qualified then ended up fourth, his worst since he was a teenager. >> the biggest thing is putting this behind me. >> he had six more chances and become the world's most decorated olympian. in the women's four hundred meter, elizabeth came in second, repr
legislation could cost a lot more than friends of obama claim. joining us from washington is mr. peter doocy. >> when the votes were tally this had repeal measure passed the house 244 to 158 and no republican defected. mark ross from arkansas, jim mestison and larry kis el from north carolina all voted in favor of repeal. it was the 33rd vote this gop controlled congress is put together to either repeal or de fund the affordable care act. the whole process is becoming a big time waster. >>> casting these votes begun and again and again probably on average once every few weeks does nothing to improve the got tomorrow line does nothing to send a single 18-year-old person to college. does nothing to help build new industries in this country. it certainly does nothing to help provide healthcare to the american people. >>> but republicans see things differently. according to the speaker of the house the only reason their bills haven't gone anywhere is because the senate has stepped up. they have the opportunity to wido just that. >> for those who support repealing this harmful healthcare law we a
the farm bill and it already passed the u.s. senate and a scheduled vote wednesday on a repeal of the affordable care act known as obama care following the ruling last week by the supreme court. it is sunday, july 8 and will begin with our focus on u.s. foreign policy and hillary clinton who is in tokyo today for a series of talks on the u.s./nato role in afghanistan or the next decade. will get your calls and comments about u.s. foreign policy generally and the performance of the secretary of state, hillary clinton specifically. our phone lines are open -- you can join the conversation on our twitter page and facebook. or send us an e-mail. there are a couple of articles related to the secretary of state and this one is from cbs news. she beat the former record held by madeleine albright. there is this from "the l.a. times." she was asked about corruption in the country. she said it is a major challenge to meet the standards of accountability and transparency. the exchange came during this unannounced stopover by the secretary of state. even if her words or encouraging, many i
, as investors and traders are counting on central banks in europe and the u.s. to announce moves next week to stimulate the global economy. here's why they're feeling confident. the heads of france and germany said today they are ready to take bolder steps to deal with the region's debt problems. in a statement they said they determined to do everything to protect the euro area. their comments came a day after the president of europe's central bank said he was prepared to do quote "whatever it takes to preserve the euro" and to ease borrowing costs for spain and italy. all this comes as federal reserve chairman bernanke has been hinting that the fed is stands ready to stimulate the u.s. economy and policymakers could do just that when they meet on tuesday in washington. with so much help potentially on the way, the dow skyrocketed almost 190 points, closing above the psychologically important 13,000 level. the nasdaq jumped 65 points and the s&p rose 26 points. for thweek, the jor averag were a up or more and one market strategist says the markets are what's driving action in europe. >> t
here. what can you tell us? >> maria, it is the guidance, intel guiding to the current quarter being $4.3 billion. the street -- $14.3 billion, the street was looking for 14.6. also full year guidance, intel is saying they expect growth in the 3 to 5% range. they had set high single digits so they are guiding down for a full year, 2012 will have to wait for the interview with stacy smith who will be on our air shortly to find out exactly why they are guiding down. and europe, asia, it's tough out there. >> it's not a surprise. we saw a number of technology names in recent weeks guide down as well talking about a tougher environment in europe and margin pressure. >> tough environment in north america also. i d.c. came out with numbers recently showing the major pc makers having a lot of trouble, particularly hp, maintaining its first place ranking among pc makers but ludsing quite a few pc sales as well. the corporate refresh cycle, saying slowing down. all of that probably hitting intel. in the past they have been able to outrun that based on growth and emerging markets, particularly in
.4% in the second quarter. there's a surprise 2.2% jump in inflation. >> hsbc is to post a jump. >> u.s. investors are looking ahead to a busy week. >>> okay. so welcome to the first trading day of the week. we're weighted to the upside one hour in the trading session for europe. after of course big rallies on the last few trading sessions of last week. the ftse 100 down half percent last week but up 2% the last three trading days. up 4.68% in the last three trading days. ftse 100 up. dax up two-thirds. the ibex today up another 1.75%. italy has got an auction out this morning. the auction focusing on -- i was going to show you three. but we got five and ten years very much in auction as well. 5.97% is where the ten year is trading. auction last month, the yield was 6.19%, lower today. the italian five year trading 5.28 at auction last month they hit 5 policy 84. auctioning up to 5.5 billion. yields in spain remain at 6.649%. hundred basis points lower. ten year bunds up to 1.4%. treasuries hit a record low. big week with the fed and employment report and of course the ecb, bank of england as well
foundation does, we use generic drugs and dave made a huge difference. and pat for money cannot be used to buy those drugs, first because eric goolsby at all the people agreed that they should anzac and because i made an agreement with president bush when he was an obvious that i would submit all of the mehdi said we sent anywhere in the world to the fda and he said if the fda approved them is the effect of an appropriate that on a local contrary could use their money to buy that meta-sin. [applause] and he kept his word. and that was the beginning of this and i'm very, very grateful for that. that means for these drugs are not available with got to do something for people without insurance who can't afford the drugs. [cheers and applause] now, our foundation has partnered with major pharmaceutical, aeneas to make access to affordable hiv medication available faster, in a simpler way on a longer-term basis of people who don't qualify for a bat, but can't afford the drug. here's the idea. we will provide a one-stop shop for uninsured patients to access all of the patient assistance progr
, and he applies the brakes or uses the steering wheel to avoid the accident. >> host: why are you up here on capitol hill? what's the importance of showing this to politicians? >> guest: first of all, we think today everyone is distracted driving. we want people to be safer, we want to expose our -- [inaudible] to capitol hill. we think there are many people who can leverage that technology in order to help us save lives, to help us spread the word out there and to, you know, the families and the drivers -- >> host: is mobileye yet available? >> guest: mobileye is available for the consumers. right now we are working with several retail chains, and we are getting more and more into the retail market, and definitely. anyone who wants the system can e-mail us at mobileye.com, we'll hook him up with an installer. >> host: isaac litman is the ceo of mobileye here at the consumer electronics show in washington. stephanie lundberg is with the ford motor company, and you have a display here at the consumer electronics show. why is ford at this tech show? >> guest: essentially, ford is a technolo
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 2,160 (some duplicates have been removed)